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Blood Donors Sought To Honor Rail Accident Victim

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The union representing Metro workers is requesting blood donations in memory of a technician who died after being struck by a train between Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia.

John Moore was a Metro employee for 12 years. His co-worker, Jim Madaras, remembers Moore as a strong man, with a subtle sense of humor.

"The one thing I have always known about John is that he's a highly intelligent person," says Madaras. "You can usually get something from conversations with him, wisdom-wise."

When Madaras learned Moore had been hit on the Blue Line, he rushed to join Moore's family at the Washington Hospital Center.

"John had a pretty sever leg injury and they had to infuse quite a bit of blood the night I was there," said Madaras. "I am not aware of how much blood they had to use after that, but it probably was still a significant amount."

Madaras says the experience inspired him to open a memorial account at the hospital's Blood Donor Center to honor his coworker and friend.

Rebecca Sheir reports...

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