: News

Filed Under:

Hundreds Gather At Memorial Service For Fallen Purcellville Soldier

Play associated audio
The community of Purcellville in Loudoun County Virginia came together today to celebrate the life of Army Specialist Stephan Mace.
Jonathan Wilson
The community of Purcellville in Loudoun County Virginia came together today to celebrate the life of Army Specialist Stephan Mace.

The community of Purcellville in Loudoun County Virginia came together today to celebrate the life of Army Specialist Stephan Mace.

Mace died from wounds suffered in combat in Afghanistan on October 3rd. He'll be buried at Arlington cemetery on October 19th.

Today more than 750 people gathered for a memorial service inside Purcellville Baptist Church, paying tribute to a young man described as fun-loving, devoted, and fearless.

Austin Boddicker says Stephan Mace was one of his best friends. "I'm gonna miss him," Boddicker said after the service. "He was a bad ass, man. He'd tell me to shut up and stop crying if he ever saw me doing this."

Mace, who was 21 years old, was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, a NATO medal, and a medal for good conduct at the ceremony.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.