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Democrat Volunteers In Virginia Urge Party Towards Obama

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Some Democrats in Northern Virginia say closer ties to the White House would have made the difference for their party on election day.

Most of the party volunteers gathered at the Fairfax Democrats election night dinner seemed more philosophical than disappointed about their losses.

June Chason says Virginia Democrats and their gubernatorial candidate -- Creigh Deeds -- should have asked the White House for more help.

"I felt that Deeds could have gone to Obama sooner than he did," Chason says.

For Jim McBride it wasnt about asking for help.

He says Virginia Democrats needed to fully adopt the Presidents agenda and political tactics.

"I think we need to be embracing the President's agenda, and his outreach methods to young people, African-Americans, and other groups of people," McBride says.

Despite misgivings about this election McBride and many other volunteers say they still feel Virginia is fertile ground for the Democratic Party.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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