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Crews Work To Clear Residential Streets Of Snow

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Montgomery County, Maryland is among one of many counties in the region with several inches of snow.
Elliot Francis
Montgomery County, Maryland is among one of many counties in the region with several inches of snow.

WASHINGTON (AP) Officials in Maryland and D.C. say main highways are passable as snow removal continues.

Maryland State Highway Administration spokeswoman Mariska Jordan said Monday that most of the state's interstates and main roads are drivable. Freezing temperatures, however, have left some roads icy.

In Washington a spokeswoman for the District Department of Transportation says cleanup is on schedule. The city tries to have main streets clear within 36 hours of the end of a storm. Department spokeswoman Karyn Le Blanc says they've met that goal.

The city tries to get residential streets clear within 60 hours after a storm. Le Blanc says efforts to get residential streets clear could be hampered by the fact more snow is expected Tuesday and crews will have to pre-treat roads for that storm.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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