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Civil War Descendents Share Histories, Stories

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By Peter Granitz

Today is the first Saturday of April. And to many it’s another nice weekend day. But the first Saturday of every month means a lot more at the African-American Civil War Museum.

Descendants of African-Americans who fought in the Civil War share their lineages, family histories and personal accounts of their ancestors every first Saturday of the month.

Located two blocks west of the African American Civil War memorial, the accompanying museum houses artifacts and information about the 209,000 black veterans of the Civil War.

Hari Jones, the museum’s curator, says the building and memorial fill the perfect location: It served as a camp for freed slaves, and...

"It’s also the place where President Lincoln went to church with the freed-men," says Jones. "So it’s a very important spot not only because they were here, but because this is where they met with the president, prayed with the president and sang with the president."

Jones says the museum helps other people wishing to determine whether their ancestors fought in the Civil War.

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