: News

Get Your 'Preak On' At The Preakness Parade

Play associated audio
Event organizers hope to draw 100,000 people this weekend to
the 2010 Preakness Stakes.
Rebecca Sheir
Event organizers hope to draw 100,000 people this weekend to the 2010 Preakness Stakes.

BALTIMORE (AP) It's almost time to ''get your Preak on'' at the Preakness Parade, which has been moved to a more popular Friday night time slot.

The parade along the touristy Inner Harbor begins at 8:30 p.m. and features balloons, bands, and floats including Fifi the pink poodle, a popular kinetic sculpture from the American Visionary Art Museum.

Last year marked the first time the parade had been held the Friday night before the race instead of Saturday morning the weekend before. And organizers say the crowds responded, with more 25,000 turning out downtown.

Race organizers are also using a new ''Get Your Preak On'' ad campaign to lure young fans to the race after a ban on bringing alcohol to the track's infield hurt attendance.

Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.