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Clergy Leaders Lobby Congress Over Gun Bill

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By Peter Granitz

Leaders from the D.C. faith community are lobbying members of Congress to pull a bill that would make it easier to buy semi-automatic guns in the District.

Senators John McCain and Jon Tester are sponsoring the bill that would also allow D.C. residents to buy guns and ammo in Virginia and Maryland. The two call the bill a measure to restoring rights in the District.

But leading clergy, like E. Gail Anderson Holness, call it just the opposite. She’s the president of the Council of Churches of Greater Washington, and has been lobbying Tester to pull his support. She says local faith leaders understand the community’s needs better than anyone else.

“We’re the ones who at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday morning get the opportunity to speak to crowds of people that no one else in the world does,” says Holness.

There is a similar measure in the U.S. House. That bill also enjoys bipartisan support. Still, Congress has a full-slate of other politically potent bills before this fall’s midterm election.

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