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Save The Dream Tour Helps People Stay In Their Homes

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A free program to help homeowners struggling with their mortgages is coming back to D.C.

The Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America’s Save the Dream Tour begins tomorrow morning at the Washington Convention Center.

People are already here, at the Washington Convention Center, to get a place in line for NACA’s round-the-clock event aimed at helping homeowners modify their mortgages.

NACA tours the country, holding these events in major cities. The last time the group was here, in 2008, demand for their help was so great, the line outside the Capital Hilton stretched for blocks. This time, NACA organizers say they will be able to work with many more people. That’s because the program at the Convention Center will be open 24 hours-a-day, for 8 days straight.

NACA director Bruce Marks says his group has legally binding contracts with all of the major lenders and investors, and says many struggling homeowners will be able to get their mortgage payments cut.

“It sounds too good to be true but it is reality for thousands of homeowners, people are saving $500 a month, a $1,000 a month, same day,” says Marks.

Today several local homeowners, including Rita Lawson gave testimony about how much money they saved with NACA’s help.

They lowered my mortgage payment from $2,600 to $1,373. The event officially begins at 9 a.m. tomorrow and ends the following Friday.

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