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Art Beat - Monday, August 23, 2010

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"Art Beat" with Sabri Ben-Achour - Monday, August 23, 2010

(August 23-September 3) GOOD PERSPECTIVES Washington’s Goethe-Institut makes some wall space for the output of eight prize-winning graduate photography students from Deutschland through early September. In Gute Aussichten or “Good Perspectives” the artists eschew Photoshop, they create works of illusion the old fashioned way - out of reality.

(August 23) SCISSOR SISTERS And the Germans aren’t the only ones throwing back to the days of yore in the District this week. New York’s Scissor Sisters bring their rapturous glam rock to Washington’s DAR Constitution Hall tonight at 7. You won’t know whether to dance or pitch a tent during this carnival of camp.

(August 23-September 19) IN THE NEXT ROOM In The Next Room, Or The Vibrator Play makes its debut on the stage of Wooly Mammoth Theatre in Northwest Washington tonight. Set in the dawn of the electrical age, the comedy revolves around the creation of a vibrating medical implement originally invented to pacify “hysterical” women. It ended up producing a markedly different result.

(Background music: Booka Shade - Body Language - Interpretation)

NPR

Examining The War On Mexican Drug Cartels, Through Film And Fiction

Two new works of art — the documentary film Cartel Land and the novel The Cartel — shine a light on the seemingly endless drug war in Mexico. John Powers says both works are bleak, but gripping.
NPR

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food

Fast-food restaurants are often demonized as the epitome of unhealthfulness. But a study suggests sit-down joints may be no better when it comes to sodium, saturated fat and the risk of overeating.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. Ranks High On 'Health' Of Democracy, Though Campaign Finance Laws Lag

According to a new report, D.C. fares well in providing access to the ballot — but falls behind due to the weakness of its campaign finance laws.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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