: News

D.C.-Area Jobless Rate Expected To Drop

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

The Bureau of Labor Statistics plans to announce the latest unemployment numbers for the D.C. area today. Analysts expect joblessness to drop for the seventh month in a row. But for residents still out of work, staying optimistic can be a challenge.

Wendy Jason of Takoma Park, Maryland, has been seeking a job since April.

"At this point I think I've applied to, oh, 60 or so jobs and I've gotten one interview!," says Jason. "So it's been disheartening, to say the least."

Jason's background is in direct-care social services, and her master's degree is in conflict resolution. And as executive recruiter Mitch Halaby explains, Jason's education should make it easier for her to find work.

"Unemployment in our geographic area has traditionally been better than other areas in the country because of our location," says Halaby. "We have one of the most highly educated work forces in the country."

That's one reason Halaby expects area unemployment to keep dropping. In June, it was 6.4 percent.

But Wendy Jason suspects many of those 6.4 percent are clamoring for the same jobs.

"I think being in D.C., where there are so many universities, and so many capable people out there looking, I have a ton of competition," she says.

Still, it could be worse. The national jobless rate stands at 9.5 percent.

NPR

Cosby Admitted Giving Woman Quaaludes

The comedian testified in 2005 he got the sedative with the intent of giving it to women with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.