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A New Park Opens on D.C.'s Southeast Waterfront

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By Cathy Carter

The riverfront revival of southeast D.C. has been in the works for several years now. This weekend, the transformation took a big step forward.

Kate Easterly is watching her two daughters play in a fountain at Yards Park, a new five and a half acre recreational area overlooking the Anacostia River.

"Oh, it's such a wonderful draw," she says. "I mean, any green space, any open space, to be able to have the kids run around and be free and explore their environment. I think it's particularly important to connect us to the water," Easterly says.

The city-owned Yards Park is celebrating its grand opening this weekend, and is located next door to Nationals Ballpark.

It has a boardwalk, plenty of lawn space, and a curving bridge over the Anacostia.

The neighborhood has seen over $1 billion in public and private investment in the past ten years.

Michael Stevens of the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District says in a few years he hopes this corner of the District will rival Baltimore's Inner Harbor.

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