: News

Filed Under:

Neighbors Oppose Affordable Housing Plan

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

Overgrown weeds poke through broken concrete at a fallow stretch of land across the street from abandoned buildings in the Mount Vernon District of Fairfax County.

This is North Hill, where the county is about to build a mobile-home community that will serve as affordable housing. Kahan Dhillon is among those who oppose the plan as a threat to revitalization.

"Richmond Highway, unfortunately, gets the tagline "The armpit of Fairfax County." It's time to change that. I don't think we can continue with the status quo. And this development as it is, does not help the revitalization of the corridor," says Dhillon.

But supporters of the project say the plan is desperately needed. Keary Kincannon is pastor at Rising Hope Missionary Church.

"There are many, many people who are homeless and on the streets, not because they don't have an income, not because they don't work, but because there's not an affordable place for them to live," says Kincannon.

The Board of Supervisors is expected to vote on a financing plan in the coming months.

NPR

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.