: News

Denial Of Federal Grants Leaves Hole In N. Va.'s Domestic Violence Safety

Play associated audio

In Northern Virginia, several organizations dedicated to helping victims of domestic violence say the next couple of years could bring a dramatic reduction to the help that's available for women in the region.

For each of the past eight years, the Tahirih Justice Center has been awarded a federal grant from the federal office of violence against women.

Tahirih provides legal assistance to hundreds of immigrant women fleeing violent countries or homes.

This year, for reasons still unclear to Tahirih Executive Director Layli Miller-Muro, the grant has been denied.

"That is a net loss to us--over a period of two years--of over $500,000, and it puts at risk the services of more than 100 women for us," Miller-Muro says.

The same federal office is denying a grant to Northern Virginia Legal Services, which does similar work.

"The loss of these federal funds by the Tahirih Justice Center, Northern Virginia Legal Services and other organizations will result in the funds to serve over 1,000 immigrant women and girls," she says.

The Office on Violence Against Women says it gave a high score to Tahirih's grant proposal, but that there were "other factors" considered in denying the grants.

NPR

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.