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Fourth Annual State Of The Nation's River Report

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A local non-profit is warning that rapid development is squeezing out forested land. This in turn is influencing the quality of water in the Potomac River, where the D.C. region draws approximately 90 percent of its drinking water.

Forests act like a sponge -- they absorb rainfall and produce very little runoff. This compared to paved, or developed surfaces, which carry pollutants including pesticides and insecticides into the river. Slightly more than half of the land in the Potomac River basin is forested, which is less than what is needed for high water quality. Hedrick Belin, the President of the Potomac Conservancy, says the health of the Potomac depends on the health of the forests.

"This summer Trump National Golf Course in Loudon County cut down 450 trees. Today 1.5 miles of shoreline is without trees," Belin says.

Belin also says agriculture is still a leading source of pollution. He wants more support for farmers so they can change how they dispose of manure, build fences to keep cattle out of streams and build forested buffers around streams.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

Texas Textbooks And Teaching The Civil War And America's History Of Racial Segregation

This fall five million public school students in Texas will use textbooks that critics say misrepresent the Civil War and the nation's history of racial segregation. The battle over how the Civil War is taught in public schools.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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