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Fired Park Police Chief Returns<br /><span class="fp">Matt McCleskey</span>

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A U.S. Park Police chief who was fired in 2004 after complaining publicly that her department was understaffed and underfunded is officially returning to her former position Monday.

Teresa Chambers was suspended in December 2003 and fired the following July. The Interior Department said it was due to insubordination and failure to follow the chain of command.

Prior to being suspended, Chambers had complained that the Park Police force didn't have enough officers to protect national park land, including the Washington Monument and other landmarks. After her firing, she sued and claimed protection under the Whistleblower Protection Act.

Earlier this month, a federal board ordered that Chambers be reinstated, saying she's entitled to back pay, interest, and other benefits.

Sal Lauro, who has been serving as chief, is stepping down. He'll still be a senior adviser within the Department of the Interior.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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