WAMU 88.5 : News

Bag Tax Passes In Montgomery County

Play associated audio
Montgomery County will start charging 5 cents per bag in 2012.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bas68/4899913014/
Montgomery County will start charging 5 cents per bag in 2012.

The County Council passed the measure 8-1, meaning a 5 cent tax on each paper or plastic take-out bag from nearly all stores will be imposed at the start of 2012.

Council Vice President Roger Berliner said he and his colleagues heard a lot from their D.C. counterparts about the city's own bag tax, implemented in 2010.

"Testimony that our council heard on this perfectly reflected the testimony of Council member Wells and their experience, which was broad acceptance in the environmental community and literally not a peep from our business community," he says.

Berliner says the council's goal isn't to raise money, but to encourage shoppers to use reusable shopping bags.

Council member Nancy Floreen cast the lone dissenting vote, saying that if her colleagues were so concerned about the environmental impact of plastic bags, they should have just banned them outright.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

Texas Textbooks And Teaching The Civil War And America's History Of Racial Segregation

This fall five million public school students in Texas will use textbooks that critics say misrepresent the Civil War and the nation's history of racial segregation. The battle over how the Civil War is taught in public schools.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.