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Teachers' Union President: 'Excessing Is A Method Of Terminating Teachers'

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DCPS has sent notices to approximately 660* teachers and staff telling them they will be "excessed", meaning they're not needed in their present jobs.

DCPS is taking pains to say this is not the same as a layoff because employees can apply for other jobs in the school system. But they may not get one.

And while school officials say historically many are "picked up" by other principals who have vacancies, they would not provide any data to show that.

Nathan Saunders, the head of the Washington Teachers' Union, says excessing used to be understood as simply moving teachers around.

"In this system, excessing is a method of terminating teachers. And it simply pushes teachers out the door and is an excuse not to allow them back in," he says.

DCPS is expected to release more details including how many teachers will be affected Tuesday evening.

*DCPS originally said approximately 660 teachers and staff will not have their present positions. They have since updated that number to 750.

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