WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Frederick Schools, Parents Fight Over Banning Textbook

Play associated audio
The book that has some Frederick County Schools parents up in arms, Social Studies Alive.
Elliott Francis
The book that has some Frederick County Schools parents up in arms, Social Studies Alive.

The board is still weighing its options in the disagreement over the third grade social studies textbook, which some parents say is promoting a liberal agenda. They did agree to form a task force at their June 22 board meeting to look into the issue.

The Frederick County school board discussed the matter Wednesday evening with a small group of parents who want the book Social Studies Alive removed from the curriculum. The parents say portions of the text are slanted, offering leading questions about socialist ideology.

Frederick County resident Cindy Rose, who filed the original formal complaint with the board, gives an example from the textbook.

"It's hard for parents to work, it's even harder if they have children, so wouldn't it be a good idea -- and that's how its posed -- if there were free child care for all?" she says. "That to me is not something you teach a 3rd grader."

The discussion went on for three hours. While some of the seven members of the board appeared to agree with Rose's characterization, one member, Angie Fish, disagreed and says the questions engage students.

"I want them to have those critical thinking skills to make those decisions for them," she says. "Rather than me spoon feeding them what I want them to do for the rest of their lives."

But another member, James Reeder, disagreed, and while speaking to a supporter of the text, pointed to one of the disputed lessons.

"When you ask the question do you think its good to provide health care for free or however it was constructed, you are deliberately leading these kids in a certain direction," he says.

The board will form a task force to study the matter at its next meeting.

NPR

Examining The War On Mexican Drug Cartels, Through Film And Fiction

Two new works of art — the documentary film Cartel Land and the novel The Cartel — shine a light on the seemingly endless drug war in Mexico. John Powers says both works are bleak, but gripping.
NPR

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food

Fast-food restaurants are often demonized as the epitome of unhealthfulness. But a study suggests sit-down joints may be no better when it comes to sodium, saturated fat and the risk of overeating.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. Ranks High On 'Health' Of Democracy, Though Campaign Finance Laws Lag

According to a new report, D.C. fares well in providing access to the ballot — but falls behind due to the weakness of its campaign finance laws.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.