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K-2, Salvia Found In Ocean City Drug Bust

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Since the ban nearly two years ago, police say they continue to find K-2 and Salvia being peddled in shops along the boardwalk.
Ocean City Police Department
Since the ban nearly two years ago, police say they continue to find K-2 and Salvia being peddled in shops along the boardwalk.

Police officials in Ocean City have seized large quantities of illegal substances and drug paraphernalia from stores on the boardwalk.

Undercover narcotics officers purchased a sizeable amount of the newly banned synthetic drug K-2 from a boardwalk vendor this week, leading to a sting operation that found and recovered not only K-2, but also another banned synthetic drug Salvia, as well as two dozen pipes, and seven fixed fighting knives.

Police reports say the employee who sold the undercover officers the K-2 said he knew it was illegal, but was, "selling it on the sly from their stock from the backroom of the store."

Since the ban on K-2 earlier this month, and the ban on Salvia almost two years ago, police say they continue to find both products being peddled in shops along the boardwalk.

This is the second big sting operation in the last month, as federal agents raided 24 shops simultaneously, seizing the largest stash of bootlegged clothing and products from the boardwalk stores in the town's history.

Charges in both cases are still pending.

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