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Home Prices Edged Up In July, Report Says

July marked a fourth consecutive month of slight gains in home prices in its surveys covering major cities across the nation, researchers who put together the widely watched S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices just reported.

The researchers' 10-city and 20-city composite indexes each rose 0.9 percent in July from June.

Their report adds that: "Seventeen of the 20 [metropolitan areas] ... posted positive monthly increases; Las Vegas and Phoenix were down over the month and Denver was unchanged. On an annual basis, Detroit and Washington D.C. were the two [areas] that posted positive rates of change, up 1.2 percent and 0.3 percent, respectively. The remaining 18 [regions] and the 10- and 20- City Composites were down in July 2011 versus the same month last year."

So, cautions David Blitzer, who chairs the committee that puts together the report, "we are still far from a sustained recovery. Eighteen of the 20 cities and both composites are showing that home prices are still below where they were a year ago."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
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New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

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UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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