NPR : News

Filed Under:

Tips Led To Tulsa Shooting Suspects' Arrests; Police Say They've Confessed

The key moment in the manhunt for suspects in a murder spree that terrorized African-Americans in Tulsa, Okla., came Saturday morning when a tip was called in to the city's Crime Stoppers hotline, the Tulsa World says.

The caller said 19-year-old Jake England was involved in Friday morning's shootings, which left three people dead and two seriously wounded, as The Associated Press writes.

Then, "over the course of [Saturday], police received dozens of tips about the shootings and a handful that implicated England, including one that said England owned a white pickup and intended to burn it," the World adds.

In "the waning hours of Saturday night," police tracked down England and his alleged accomplice, 33-year-old Alvin Watts.

Now, according to documents filed by police, the men have confessed. They're being held on pay of $9.16 million each. According to the AP, "police have said one motive for the shootings may have been England's desire to avenge his father's fatal shooting by a black man two years ago."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

America's First Ladies

They walk a tricky line: closest adviser to the President of the United States and hostess in chief. A new book examines the evolution of the role of first lady of the United States.

WAMU 88.5

E-Cigarettes and Vaping

Last week, the D.C. Council voted to designate e-cigarettes and "similar vapor products containing nicotine" as tobacco products. That means that their sales tax will jump from the regular 5.75% sales tax to the 70% tax that's tacked onto sales of products like cigarettes and cigars. We explore what this means for the evolving public health debate surrounding e-cigarettes.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.