WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Last Summer's Legionnaire's Scare Doesn't Shutter Condo

Play associated audio

One of Ocean City's high-rise condominiums remains open today, even after reports that two of its guests allegedly contracted Legionnaires' disease during their stay at the oceanfront complex last year.

Worcester County Health officials say they can't confirm whether the two unidentified guests, who stayed at the Sea Watch condominium at different times in 2011, were definitively exposed to legionella bacteria during their stay, but they will confirm that the bacteria was found in the building's water supply.

Legionnaires' disease is a form of pneumonia usually contracted after inhaling water vapors or mist that contains the bacteria.

Despite this announcement, the Sea Watch remains open for business. Condominium owners have been instructed, per a health department mandate, to inform all of their potential tenants about the risks and the dangers associated with Legionnaires' disease.

Last fall, there were six reported cases of Legionnaires' and one fatality after an outbreak at a downtown hotel in the resort city. Signs of Legionnaires' disease include fever, shortness of breath, and flu-like symptoms, and usually come to light within 2 weeks of exposure to the bacteria.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food

Fast-food restaurants are often demonized as the epitome of unhealthfulness. But a study suggests sit-down joints may be no better when it comes to sodium, saturated fat and the risk of overeating.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.