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Tour Guide In Your Pocket: National Zoo Puts Out iPhone App

Panda fans can now get their fix anywhere they have cell phone reception.
Mehgan Murphy
Panda fans can now get their fix anywhere they have cell phone reception.

There's a new iPhone app to help visitors of the Smithsonian National Zoo find their way around and learn more about the animals they see.

Available on the iTunes store for $1.99, the app sports GPS-enabled maps, walking audio tours, news and lists of the day's activities. For inclimate days when the animals aren't out and about, the app also features live cams and movies of the zoo's most popular inhabitants — including pandas, gorillas, lions, tigers and more.

For a bit of extra fun, the app also sports a "Zooify Yourself" feature, that lets you add animal features like red panda ears or oryx horns to one of your photos.

Proceeds from sales of the application will fund conservation and research operations. According to the National Zoo, the app is iOS only right now, but an Android version is in the works.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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