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This Just In: No One Was Shot Or Stabbed Monday In New York City

Police officials in New York City tell the Daily News that they can't remember the last time this happened:

"Not a single person was reported shot, stabbed or slashed" in the Big Apple on Monday.

"Nice way to start the week," Deputy Police Commissioner Paul Browne told the newspaper.

The city's nonviolent streak didn't last long, though. Late Tuesday morning, the Daily News says, "a 27-year-old man was shot in Brooklyn at Ralph and Flatlands Ave."

Still, the news seems to be part of a welcome trend. As NY1 reports, "NYPD statistics show the city has come a long way since 1990, when there was an average of more than six murders a day and 2,200 a year. This year, the city is on pace for just about 400 murders."

The news has been much different, as you may have heard, in the nation's Second City. As NPR's David Schaper has reported, homicides and shootings are up sharply this year in Chicago. The homicide rate there is up about 20 percent from 2011 and there have been about 1,800 nonfatal shooting incidents.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
NPR

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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