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Dramatic Drop In Crime Reported In Prince George's County

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Prince George's County executive Rushern Baker said Wednesday that he believes the decline in the crime rate is sustainable.
Elliott Francis
Prince George's County executive Rushern Baker said Wednesday that he believes the decline in the crime rate is sustainable.

Prince George's County officials today announced what they say is a historic reduction of crime in the county.

In January 2011, Prince George s County recorded 14 homicides in the first 19 days of the year. Soon after, newly-installed county executive Rushern Baker along with local, state and federal officials created the Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative hoping to reduce crime.

Today Baker joined State's Attorney Angela Alsobrooks, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and others to reveal crime in the county for 2012 is down 7 percent, along with a 35 percent reduction in homicides in the past two years.

"The point is that last year we had 3,800 less victims in our community," says County Police Chief Mark Magaw. "This year we had 2,200 less victims — that's 6,000 less victims in two years."

Baker says the numbers are dramatic and can be maintained.

"We believe these numbers are sustainable," Baker says. "We believe that this can be the norm for Prince George s County, crime decreasing in every area."

Baker also says he supports Gov. Martin O'Malley's pledge to sponsor a bill to ban assault rifles in the state.

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