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D.C. Lost Millions During Shutdown, But True Cost Will Be Known In December

It is estimated the District lost millions in sales tax revenue as hotel rooms and restaurant tables stayed empty because federal workers and tourists stayed home during the federal government shutdown.

But at a D.C. Council hearing on Friday, the city's chief economist, Fitzroy Lee, said all the numbers aren't in yet. He pointed out that while furloughed workers lost wages, they will receive back pay—and the city will get income tax revenue.

"Unfortunately we are not going to know the actually revenue impact until December," he said.

City Administrator Allen Lew said the District's contingency fund was spent to pay employees.

"At the beginning of the shutdown there was approximately $150 million dollars available in the contingency reserve fund. The office of the Chief Financial Officer estimated that the District spends approximately $10 million per day on employees salaries," he said.

The fund has since been mostly replenished. D.C. incurred no major expenses during the shutdown, other than spending about $100,000 picking up trash on federal park lands—money that D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray won't be asking to be reimbursed.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food

Fast-food restaurants are often demonized as the epitome of unhealthiness. But a study suggests sit-down joints may be no better when it comes to sodium, saturated fat and the risk of overeating.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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