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Construction To Begin On 175-Foot-Tall Ferris Wheel At National Harbor

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The 175-foot-tall ferris wheel will offer views of the Washington skyline.
Brown Craig Turner Architects + Designers
The 175-foot-tall ferris wheel will offer views of the Washington skyline.

The first pieces of a giant ferris wheel have arrived in Prince George's County.

The Capital Wheel was dragged up the Potomac River on a tugboat, and now that it's there, construction is scheduled to start later this week.

"We will continue to see arrivals of various different components that the contractors will need to put together the wheel," says Angela Sweeney, a spokesperson for The Peterson Companies, a developer for the National Harbor where the wheel will be built.

Sweeney says once the wheel is built, visitors can ride one of the 42 gondolas, which will cost $15.

"It's rather tall and it will offer stunning views of the White House, the Washington Monument, Alexandria," she says.

Sweeney says the wheel will also be something of a site on it's own, standing 175 feet high and lit up with 1.6 million lights at night.

Developers say the Capital Wheel will be finished in May.

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