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As Purple Line Moves Forward, Supporters Convene

The Purple Line Corridor Coalition met for the first time Friday on the presumption the 16-mile light rail project will be built, and it's looking like it will be.

This week, the federal government issued its final environmental approval—an important milestone. Now the Maryland Transit Administration can begin condemning private properties currently standing in the Purple Line's planned route.

"There will be opposition. We already know there is opposition and where it is coming from," says Gerrit Knaap, a coalition member and the director of the National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland. "I am hopeful we can resolve these issues amicably without reverting to lawsuits, but it is really hard to predict these things."

He says the coalition's work will consist of showing communities along the right-of-way the benefits of light rail—"in terms of walkable communities and high-density development."

More than 100 homes and business may be displaced by construction. Work on the $2.4 billion Purple Line could begin in 2015 and last about five years.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

America's First Ladies

They walk a tricky line: closest adviser to the President of the United States and hostess in chief. A new book examines the evolution of the role of first lady of the United States.

WAMU 88.5

E-Cigarettes and Vaping

Last week, the D.C. Council voted to designate e-cigarettes and "similar vapor products containing nicotine" as tobacco products. That means that their sales tax will jump from the regular 5.75% sales tax to the 70% tax that's tacked onto sales of products like cigarettes and cigars. We explore what this means for the evolving public health debate surrounding e-cigarettes.

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