Filed Under:

Goodie Mob: Building New Leaders From The Elders

Play associated audio

From Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy" to his solo hit "F--- You" to his work as a judge on the NBC talent show The Voice, you can't escape Cee-Lo Green these days. But that Hollywood persona seems far away from the Atlanta scene where Green got his real start with the group that put Southern hip-hop on the map in the mid-1990s: Goodie Mob. Now, after 14 years, all four members are back together, which Green says is an opportunity to bring something new and deep to hip-hop.

"For hip-hop, we felt like we could bring some maturity, bring some consciousness, bring some wisdom, you know?" he says.

Goodie Mob's new album, Age Against the Machine, aims to challenge mainstream hip-hop. Members Cee-Lo Green and Big Gipp recently spoke with NPR's David Greene about songs like "Special Education" and a need to build new leaders. Click the audio link to hear more of their conversation.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.