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Ad Dramatizes Trayvon Martin Shooting

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The Trayvon Martin shooting is at the center of a new video that advocates changing gun policy. The internet video reenacts George Zimmerman's shooting of the unarmed Florida teen, and includes tape from the 9-1-1 calls that night.

At the end of the ad, the camera slowly pans over a scene of several young people, all wearing hoodies, all lying across the ground as if they had been shot. Finally a message comes on screen, asking viewers to fight so-called 'Stand Your Ground' laws across the country. The video comes from the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence. Josh Horwitz, the organization's Executive Director, joined Celeste Headlee on Tell Me More today.

"I think those pictures of George Zimmerman have been shown ad nauseum [to] the public. I think what hasn't been shown is the true affects of 'stand your ground.' Every time someone claims a stand your ground defense there's a dead body at the other side. And we don't talk about that enough."

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Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews MaryClaire Dale, an Associated Press reporter, about the court documents showing Cosby said in 2005 he got quaaludes to give to a woman with whom he wanted to have sex.
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Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

A company is introducing mechanized rice farming to the interior of Malaysian Borneo for the first time. Scientists say the change may damage the bonds between the local people and their environment.
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UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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