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Warren Haynes On World Cafe

Warren Haynes is one of Rolling Stone's 25 greatest guitarists of all time. Since the 1980s, he's played with the Allman Brothers, the reunited Dead, and his own band, Gov't Mule. Before he took up the guitar, though, Haynes says he wanted to be a singer.

"The first sound that ever made the hair on my arms stand up was black gospel music coming over the radio in North Carolina where I grew up. I got this feeling I couldn't explain," Haynes tells host David Dye in today's interview.

Blues and gospel music are still a major influence on Haynes' singing and guitar playing, a love that he showcases on his new solo album, Man in Motion. He cites his inspirations for the record as B.B. King, Freddie King and Albert King: "The three kings, my blues heroes."

On today's World Cafe, hear the full conversation with Haynes and a rollicking set from his new solo album onstage at World Cafe Live.

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