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It Was All A Dream (Or: Turns Out Spoilers Are Good For You)

The combination of instant commentary on Twitter and delayed viewing on DVRs and Hulu has made fans especially careful about spoilers. But according to one study, spoilers actually make you enjoy a work more than if you didn't know what was going to happen.
NPR

Christopher Beha, On Faith And Its Discontents

The author's What Happened to Sophie Wilder features a convert to Catholicism, and another character who struggles to understand her faith. Beha tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about his Catholic upbringing, irony's place in fiction and literature's therapeutic aspects.
WAMU 88.5

Bookend: Novelist H.G. Carrillo On His Love Of D.C.

In our monthly series on D.C.'s literary scene, novelist H.G. Carrillo talks about why he loves to live and work in the nation's capital.

NPR

'The Twilight War' Between The U.S. And Iran

In The Twilight War, historian David Crist outlines the secret history of America's 30-year conflict with Iran. Based on interviews with hundreds of officials as well as classified military archives, the book details how the covert war has repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare.
NPR

Review: 'The Diesel'

The Diesel was originally published in Arabic in 1994 and is the first novel by poet Thani Al-Suwaidi. William Hutchins recently translated the book into English.
NPR

'In The Attic': Whips, Witches And A Peculiar Princess

Flowers In The Attic is saucy and scandalous, but author Gillian Flynn says it was the complex, often evil women in the story that kept her turning the pages. Do you have a favorite female villain? Tell us about her in the comments.
NPR

Unraveling The Genetic Code That Makes Us Human

In The Violinist's Thumb, writer Sam Kean goes inside our genetic code, looking at the stories written by the fundamental building blocks within us. The book explains things like why some people can't handle drinking coffee and why some human babies are born with tails.
NPR

Jo Nesbo's Fiction Explores Oslo's Jagged Edges

The Norwegian author does his best to show NPR's Eric Westervelt that Oslo really does have a seedy side. In his fiction, at least, Nesbo's city is full of shady characters who draw the attention of the reckless, alcoholic detective Harry Hole.

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