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NPR

What's Killing 'King Coal' In West Virginia?

For decades, coal represented half of the nation's electricity generation, but it dropped to only 34 percent for the month of March. While the decline is partially due to a warmer winter and stricter environmental regulations, the real culprit may be natural gas. Technological breakthroughs in fracking have led to a gas boom that's caused prices to plummet. As a result, power plants are switching from coal to natural gas and mines in Appalachia are shutting down.
NPR

The Nuts And Bolts Of High-Speed Rail

California lawmakers gave the green light to the first phase of construction of high-speed rail in the state. Does this mean that America is on track for faster, sleeker trains? What potential speed bumps still lie ahead? Railroad engineer Christopher Barkan discusses the costs, benefits and state of the technology.
NPR

The Natural Gas Boom: Doing More Harm Than Good?

Some people are embracing the wave of increased natural gas extraction in the United States. Others, concerned about the risks, are saying no fracking way. A panel of experts weighs the pros and cons of a boom sparked by hydraulic fracturing in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Senator Wants To Stop Utility Outage Fees

In Maryland, when storms knock out power, utilities actually charge users a fee for services they're not deliver. One state senator wants to change that practice.

NPR

Waste Not, Want Not: Town To Tap Sewers For Energy

Officials in Brainerd, Minn., say the sewers below the city streets are a huge potential source of energy that could be used for heating and cooling. A local company has devised a system to capture the energy, and city officials plan to hook up the police station by the end of the year.
NPR

Firm Blamed In The Costliest Onshore Oil Spill Ever

More than 800,000 gallons of crude oil gushed into wetlands and a creek in western Michigan in 2010 after a pipeline operated by the Canadian company Enbridge burst. Now, the National Transportation Safety Board says the company and the agency that regulates it are culpable.

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