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NPR

10 Years Since Katrina: A Look Back At The Busiest Hurricane Season

Meteorologists say this year's hurricane season will be quieter than usual. But if a Category 3 or higher hit the U.S., it would be the first time since 2005, one of the worst years on record.
NPR

Editing The Climate Talkers: Punctuation's Effect On Earth's Fate

The littlest things — punctuation, precise word choice and grammar — can hold tremendous power in worldwide climate negotiations. This year in Europe, editors get a chance to help make history.
NPR

At World's Fair In Italy, The Future Of Food Is On The Table

Vertical farms, food trucks, tropical forests and the supermarket of the future are on display at Expo 2015 in Milan. Exhibits from 145 countries focus on how to feed the planet sustainably.
NPR

Conservationists Warn Hunting, Development Threaten New Species

Crawford Allan of TRAFFIC, an anti-wildlife trafficking organization, tells NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates that the rarity of some of these species in Southeast Asia make them desirable to illegal trade.
NPR

Fact-Checking 'San Andreas': Are Earthquake Swarms For Real?

Seismologist Lucile Jones discusses how accurate — or not — the plot of this new California earthquake thriller really is. Bonus: Her advice on what to include in an earthquake kit.
NPR

Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall

More rain is forecast this weekend in North Texas after up to 7 inches fell last night across parts of the state, causing colonies of fire ants and snakes to take shelter in houses.
NPR

Administration Announces Controversial Plan To Protect Sage Grouse

The Interior Department plans to conserve millions of acres of habitat for the greater sage grouse in 10 states. The move limits areas where petroleum and agriculture development can take place.
WAMU 88.5

Wherever D.C. Is Wild, Biologists Will Have A Plan For Action

Most states have a plan for protecting wildlife, especially species that are becoming increasingly rare. The District of Columbia lacks any such policy, but a new Wildlife Action Plan, in theory, will fill that void.

NPR

Navajo Nation Witnesses Changing Landscape: Growing Sand Dunes

A U.S. Geological Survey researcher says she's worried about the Navajo because drought, combined with increasing temperatures, are making it harder for them to live in the harsh conditions.
NPR

Oklahoma Hangs On As Heavy Rain Continues To Soak Region

Oklahoma continues to battle flooding from storms in the region, which brought the state out of a four-year drought. Rain is expected every day until Sunday.

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