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Two Strangers Come Together To Remember A Friend And Loved One

Sgt. 1st Class Carl Torello was killed in Vietnam when his daughter was just 5 years old. Nearly 50 years later, she got a chance to meet the one person who survived the attack that killed him.
NPR

Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

Steve Cook, who heads the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association, tells NPR that soldiers returning from World War II formed biker gangs, which became infamous during a 1947 riot.
NPR

When Is A Filibuster Not Really a Filibuster? When It Looks Like A Filibuster

Filibusters were once reserved for the gravest existential issues. Rand Paul's long hours Wednesday were about liberty, the Constitution and the need to stand out in a field of presidential hopefuls.
NPR

Muddled Messages In America's Past

Communication breakdown is not a new phenomenon. American history features a mass — and a mess — of misunderstood messages.
NPR

#MotorCityDrive: Is Detroit's Economic Engine Roaring Back To Life?

Michel Martin heads to Detroit for a live conversation with some of the creative forces fueling the Motor City's economy. She'll ask what's driving Detroit's future now?
NPR

Why A Chinese Government Think Tank Attacked American Scholars

The think tank's article says professors are miscasting the history of the country's Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). That's big for the Communist Party, which is invested in history — and who interprets it.
NPR

'My Fair Lady' Couldn't Actually Dance All Night, So These Songs Had To Go

The musical has some of the best-known songs in Broadway history, but it originally had other tunes that almost no one knows. Some of those songs were recently performed for the first time in decades.
NPR

Who Is Clinton Confidant Sidney Blumenthal?

Emails from informal adviser Blumenthal to Hillary Clinton on U.S. policy in Libya have been subpoenaed by a House committee. He's no stranger to controversy, but Clinton says he's just an old friend.
NPR

For New Immigrants To The U.S., Ellis Island Still Means A Lot

Twelve million immigrants passed through Ellis Island before it closed as an inspection station in 1954. The museum is expanding to tell the history of immigration to the U.S. in more recent decades.
NPR

Tea Tuesdays: Cold Weather, Gogol And The Rise Of The Russian Samovar

The giant, metal, hot-water urns are at the center of Russian tea culture — and national identity. How that came to be may have as much to do with Russian literature as common usage.

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