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NPR

President Koroma: Sierra Leone's Beaches Make It A Place To Visit

A little over a decade ago, Sierra Leone was in the grip of a brutal civil war that tore the country apart. Today, the economy is on the mend and it's moving forward with reconciliation and reconstruction. Host Michel Martin speaks to Sierra Leone's president Ernest Bai Koroma to find out more about his challenges and successes.
NPR

Cable And Corruption In Southern California

The Galloway brothers, Clinton and Carl, spent most of the 1980s fighting to get poor minorities in Southern California access to cable television. It was a struggle that took them from City Hall to the Supreme Court. Clinton Galloway talks with host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Anatomy of a Hustle: Cable Comes to South Central L.A.
NPR

An Unlikely Explorer Stumbles Into Controversy

The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu first introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption. Now, there's a new book that tells his story.
NPR

Living Memories From The Last Days Of Alcatraz

Even without prisoners, Alcatraz remains one of the most infamous prisons in America. Five decades after it closed, it still captures the public's imagination. Those who stayed there, however, can tell you exactly what doing time on "The Rock" was like.
NPR

Old Newspapers Shed New Light On Emmett Till Murder

New details about one of Mississippi's most infamous murders are coming to light — more than a half-century later. The death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy who allegedly whistled at a white woman, helped spark the civil rights movement.
WAMU 88.5

African American Service In The Civil War

Civil War scholar Ron Coddington has compiled a collection of portraits of these men and used the images as a jumping off point for telling their stories. He joins Kojo to help us understand the Civil War as they experienced it.

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